Jennifer Haraguchi

Associate Professor , French & Italian

3139 JFSB

801-422-8179

Curriculum Vitae

Research Areas: , , ,

Teaching Experience

I enjoy teaching Italian literature to students with diverse backgrounds in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences who bring varied experiences, training, methodologies, and viewpoints to bear on shared issues and concerns. My overarching goals are to facilitate rich classroom discussions and help students successfully research and write in clear and convincing ways on topics that most interest them.

Research

My primary research focus is the education of women in early modern Italy, women’s writings, and women’s social and religious history. Through archival work, I seek to uncover and document the beginnings of public education in Italy for women. A secondary interest is memory in the medieval period. Currently, I am completing a critical edition and English translation of the creative works of the seventeenth-century Florentine writer and educator Eleonora Ramirez di Montalvo for the series “The Ot

Selected Publications

“Memoria e meditazione nella Divina Commedia: strumenti per una contemplazione divina,” Cincinnati Romance Review 45 (Fall 2018): 108–20 http://www.cromrev.com/volumes/vol45/A08-Haraguchi.pdf

“Teaching Ignatian Spirituality to Rich and Poor Girls Through Dramatic Performance in Seventeenth-Century Florence,” The Sixteenth Century Journal 47.1 (April 2016): 25–51

“Istruzione alle maestre (Instruction for Teachers): A Model Text for Women’s Lay Conservatories in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Tuscany,” Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal 10.2 (April 2016): 3–21

“Convent Alternatives for Rich and Poor Girls in Seventeenth-Century Florence: The Lay Conservatories of Eleonora Ramirez di Montalvo (1602–59),” Devout Laywomen in the Early Modern World. Ed. Alison Weber. London and New York: Routledge, 2016, 255–275

“Vita di Eleonora: A Unique Example of Autobiographical Writing in Counter-Reformation Italy,” I Tatti Studies in the Italian Renaissance 17.2 (2014): 369–397

Service

One of my most rewarding service assignments is to coordinate and supervise internships in Italy for Italian-speaking students in various fields in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and business. I have seen firsthand how the internship program achieves the aims of the College of Humanities+ initiative and the overall BYU educational experience to strengthen students spiritually, enlarge the intellect, build character, and lead them to lifelong learning and service.

Citizenship assignments

Italy Internship Coordinator
Italian Writing Lab Coordinator
Faculty Affiliate, European Studies
Faculty Affiliate, Women’s Studies
Italian Studies Track Director, Sixteenth Century Society and Conference

Conference Committee

Fall Semester 2019

Office Hours
MW 1-2 p.m., and by appointment
3139 JFSB